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tragedy to a law office in san francisco in 1993. where a crazed gunman -- i remember his name but i won't say it -- with an assault weapon killed eight people and wounded six. one of those people was a brave warrior who threw his body over the body of his wife, sacrificing his own life to save hers. now, that young man was one of my son's best friends, and i know personally how these horrific and senseless tragedies live on with the survivors. the parents, the spouses, the children, the family and the friends. it changes their lives and it pierces their hearts forever. so i've told you a couple of stories about california, but let me say this. let's look at what's happened across this nation since sandy hook. in the 120 days since sandy hook, more than 2,200 americans have been killed by gun violence. hardly anyplace was spared. now, we know there are many, many firearms in america. 300 million firearms in the united states. if you were to divide that up, that would be one gun per person. of course, there are many people who just have many, many guns. now, this is a 50% increase in the
and law enforcement officials for detecting the threat before it reached the capitol. they show the we put in place work. >> arizona reporter's office notified authorities after two envelopes arrived with a suspicious substance looked out. >> these envelopes appear suspicious. if they are. it may turn out there is nothing. but because of the events of the last several days we take it seriously with the resources that we have. >> hazardous mail is undergoing testing. the american postal worker's union complained they should have been told about the tainted letrs. they learned about it on the news report. >> bret: we are going to talk about the implication. a lot of people are concerned about personal security and national security. the day after the most devastating terrorist attacks on the u.s., september 12th, 2001. america changed security wise. it had changed forever and it had. the years passed by . largely without incident. until monday in boston when a terrorist struck again either foreign or domestic and not the scale of 9/11 but affecting public consciousness in similar ways. >> it
, a bill to restore states' sovereign rights to enforce state and local sales and use tax laws, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i ask for a second reading and object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be read for a second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair. >>> one day after the boston bombings a bipartisan watch group said the government used torture and illegal interrogation methods after the september 11 attacks in 2001. that report is next on c-span2. >>> she came into the white house, she was a 47-year-old lady that he did politics. she was deeply depressed at the death of her son and especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. she didn't have many friends unfortunately, but she did have a wonderful family there always seems to be somebody there and i don't think he did very much but she was a very intellectual woman,
that? >> my best case scenario, again, if i was in law enforcement at this time, i wouldn't tell anything to the media until i had my whole case put together. you're going to have one chance at this guy. you've got to make the best case you can. as soon as his name or address goes public, you know, the media hoards are going to descend on this whole thing. as an investigator, make your case, then let the media come in. >> what more do you need, you first then jim, than a picture of a guy or person dropping a black bag at the site of a bombing and then splitting? what more evidence would you need to make a case in court than that? >> well -- >> picture of a person. >> that's circumstantial evidence. unless we have a movie of him actually doing it, unless we know that black bag was actually it. you know, there's too many ways as you well know that you can be attacked in court for different reasons, suggesting his hand's really not on the bag and maybe somebody dropped it a second before he walked by. there's a lot to put together from the forensic side other than a picture where he
and 15 and among those are 3 to 5 firefighters and perhaps one law enforcement officer. houses were blocked around this fertilizer plant. i was in kauffman, county, 60 miles away and we could feel it there. the concussion rattled the windows. we thought it was the approaching storms but it turned out it was much worse than that. it was an explosion that killed several people here in town and perhaps dozens more. mika? >> willie? >> willie geist here. is there any suspension whatsoever of criminal element to this at all? i think the officer who just spoke at the press conference defected that a little bit and hadn't seen any sign of that. is there any suspicion or are they looking into that? >> the officers said they want to treat it as a crime scene until they can rule it out it it wasn't a crime and it was, indeed an industrial accident. in fact, texas has a long history of industrial accidents involving anhydrous ammonia dating 66 years ago on april 16th, 1947, thousands of people were killed in texas city which a ship carrying the same type of fertilizer that blew up here explode
has now been arrested. >> i was told by a boston law enforcement source, we've got him. >> bill: we got him john king said and not only that, he even identified -- not identified, he described, he described this mystery man who had been arrested. >> federal law enforcement source says an arrest has been made based on two different videos showing a video of the suspect. a dark-skinned male placing a package at the second explosion site and backing away. >> bill: you know he had to be a dark-skinned man. right? exactly. john king. wrong on both counts. no arrest. no dark skin. no, we got him. no nothing. what they did find is from the video, they have some video from a lord & taylor department store looking across the street at a male who was wearing a big backpack and puts the pack back down and runs away when the first blast is heard up the street. that's giving police some very good leads plus the pieces of the backpack that they found and the pieces of the pressure cooker that they found. and they're working on the case. but the media can't wait. they just can't. and then cnn repo
the dead and possibly one law enforcement officer is missing. and our affiliate in houston kprc is reporting that the mobile morgue has been dispatched to west. that's an indication they intend find more bodies in the rubble. >> i know this is being treated as a crime scene. is that just out of an assumption of taking precaution here that it could be or do they know something? >> reporter: it's the world we live in, chuck. they are going to try to rule out the crime right away and focus on what they really believe it is and that's an industrial accident. and it's an industrial accident that sadly has been a part of texas history. back in 1947, in texas city, texas, two ships loaded with ammonia nitrate, same product here exploded killing thousands of people. it's the worst industrial accident in all of the united states. >> what about the first responders in west, texas? did they have the ability to deal with a disaster like this? experience and training? there have been some questions about that this morning. >> reporter: they have what they call mutual aid here. when the fire
, methodical, careful and professional investigation. we've got every imaginable law enforcement agency at the federal, state, and local level. they are working very, very well together under the leadership of the fbi. it is going to take time. it's a several block crime scene and it's being combed sort of a quarter inch by quarter inch. it's going to be a slow investigation but i think as every hour and day passes, they make progress. >> what do you think is the attitude? you would know it as well as anyone up there, the attitude of the boston people and the massachusetts people about this? do they just feel that they are victims, something bad happened? or is there a sense of anger, if you will, that somebody would do this or a group of would do this? >> well, i think it's a mixture of all of that and more. i think certainly people are shocked, shaken in many, many cases shattered that something like this could happen at a civic ritual like the marathon of which we are so proud and on patriots day, there's frustration that the perpetrators haven't been found but i think people should
a portion of military law. it's not enough, but it's a good start. >> congresswoman, are you finding that the pentagon under chuck hagel, i know he hasn't been in office very long, he had a rocky confirmation process, do you have their attention? and are they responsive to your requests? >> they absolutely are. i don't think it could have gone anywhere near far enough. they say we have a zero tolerance policy and there's nothing like a zero tolerance policy going on out there. about you have increasing members of congress who are actively engaged in this conversation. recently a group of us were over at the pentagon meeting with the vice chiefs of staff at all levels, they are saying we're trying to change the culture. we're trying to change the training, we're trying to change our ability to talk about this. and part of what they need to do is change the number of prosecutions and laws. as anu said and you've heard, the military code of justice does not exactly follow civilian law. and there are reasons it's different. but civilian law was updated a long time ago with respect to how
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9